PROCESS:


                                         Patagonia  2016

The work begins in places that are difficult to reach, that are wild and vast.  A several-hour hike can bring me to a vantage point that others cannot or will not ever see. 


                            Namibia,  2013
From a height, with unmarked terrain as far as the eye can see, there is only the temperature, the sound of the wind, the silence.


                                       Ireland  2012
Over the course of a day, the weather shifts, the trail may come and go, a fog may obscure the hillside changing the landscape from one moment to the next.


    
                                 Scotland  2015
You arrive by the work of your body.  The visual discoveries along the way are the reward, and the memory of what it took to get there becomes inseparably linked to the feeling of being there.


                        Sketchbook Hawaii 2016

I travel light, carrying a sketchbook for drawings and small watercolors, written descriptions.

            
                          Sketchbook Namibia  2013  
  
    

I have, over the years of working in remote places, developed a way of writing and drawing that allows me to recall the sensory memories when I return to my studio.


                           Studio Drawing  2008 
When I return to my studio after a journey, I reassemble my notes and sketches and begin the drawings which will serve as road maps for the paintings.  I am retracing my steps, recalling how it felt to be there.



                           Studio Washington, DC  


                      Studio Washington, DC  
In my studio I am able to execute large scale paintings whose size can incorporate vastness and fill the viewer's field of vision.



                         Studio Washington, DC  
I extend the image around the edges of the canvas stretcher in order to allow the finished painting to suggest continuation and to float unencumbered on the wall.




Between working on the large scale paintings I sometimes will do a series of small works.  These distillations allow me to further explore some of the ideas I have been working with, isolating and condensing them.


 

Sections

PROCESS

PROCESS:


                                         Patagonia  2016

The work begins in places that are difficult to reach, that are wild and vast.  A several-hour hike can bring me to a vantage point that others cannot or will not ever see. 


                            Namibia,  2013
From a height, with unmarked terrain as far as the eye can see, there is only the temperature, the sound of the wind, the silence.


                                       Ireland  2012
Over the course of a day, the weather shifts, the trail may come and go, a fog may obscure the hillside changing the landscape from one moment to the next.


    
                                 Scotland  2015
You arrive by the work of your body.  The visual discoveries along the way are the reward, and the memory of what it took to get there becomes inseparably linked to the feeling of being there.


                        Sketchbook Hawaii 2016

I travel light, carrying a sketchbook for drawings and small watercolors, written descriptions.

            
                          Sketchbook Namibia  2013  
  
    

I have, over the years of working in remote places, developed a way of writing and drawing that allows me to recall the sensory memories when I return to my studio.


                           Studio Drawing  2008 
When I return to my studio after a journey, I reassemble my notes and sketches and begin the drawings which will serve as road maps for the paintings.  I am retracing my steps, recalling how it felt to be there.



                           Studio Washington, DC  


                      Studio Washington, DC  
In my studio I am able to execute large scale paintings whose size can incorporate vastness and fill the viewer's field of vision.



                         Studio Washington, DC  
I extend the image around the edges of the canvas stretcher in order to allow the finished painting to suggest continuation and to float unencumbered on the wall.




Between working on the large scale paintings I sometimes will do a series of small works.  These distillations allow me to further explore some of the ideas I have been working with, isolating and condensing them.


 

Sections